Tag Archives: Accidental Brand

Do you know your Culture Gateways?

Bringing new people into your organization is an important (and inevitable) part of growth. Each new person is affected by—and affects—the culture of your brand. Leaders with a clear understanding of their brand strategy have hired people according to core values, and the result is a deeper, richer culture.

New employees meet existing teams, find connections, and work together in task and attitude towards a shared purpose. The brand continues to thrive.

Theoretically, it works seamlessly. Realistically, new people are outsiders until they are trusted by the team—not the implied trust of carrying the same banner, but rather the type of trust that is earned through shared experiences and challenges; through learning about each other as people, not just roles in the organization.

Feed Your CultureEach organization finds unique ways teams connect. There are no rules, limits or fool-proof best practices for finding the trust every team requires. For some it’s social events; for others it is working through a full cycle of a project or deadline together; for others there are relevant (or obscure) rituals and milestones that need to be reached. For many it’s a mix of a few things.

An organizational culture is inevitable. Too often, though, it is often accidental and thriving on the path of least resistance. Who is feeding your culture?

As a leader, do you know the Culture Gateways for your organization? Do you understand—and make time for—the events and rituals that your culture asks of itself? Do you feed your culture, or do you expect it to live off whatever filters through the burden of productivity?

New employees can get overwhelmed during even the most thoughtful on-boarding process. New policies, new peers, new possibilities—there is plenty of new information pushing towards fresh members of your team and it’s easy to let the culture component occur accidentally.

Smart brand leaders understand that when new employees integrate into the culture quickly, smoothly, honestly and enthusiastically, the benefits are exponentially greater. Trust—the deep trust required to push boundaries, challenge ideas, and risk authentically—is reached sooner. The value and influence of true teams is realized.

Smart brand leaders understand and encourage the Culture Gateways that are required by the organization. Whether true planning is required, or simply giving permission and getting out of the way, leaders recognize the resources required—time, space, workload, stuff—and not only let it happen, they make sure it happens. It’s purposeful and measured, not accidental. Smart brand leaders know they get the culture they nurture, and the right culture is at the foundation of brand success.

Embracing Culture Gateways—the launch pad to the human side of on-boarding and a rich brand culture—is critical to building a strong brand and is not left to chance. Do you know the Culture Gateways of your brand strategy?

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Accidental Excellence in Customer Service.

Accidental excellence in customer service is the curse of hiring great people. It’s not really a curse, of course. Great staff are awesome; a blessing for any organization. But you can’t take credit for their excellence—it’s not synonymous with the brand—if you didn’t train them to create an amazing experience by giving them the tools, systems, responsibilities and permission to deliver.

If you can’t tell me why all your staff are awesome, and prove it every time, it’s a wake up call for your brand strategy. Everything is at stake.

Most people would agree that some standard rules are the key to delivering a great customer experience: treat people nicely, listen to them and respond to their needs, deliver what you promise, and—pushing from good to great service—take a moment to exceed their expectations. It’s not rocket science—it’s simple, human behaviour.

As business leaders, we know it’s possible to have a standard of care that far exceeds what many people now expect as normal—routine, scripted, formulaic transactions. We also know that it’s important; very often the customer service experience is the thin line that separates us from our competitors. Very often it’s the only value we add.

What’s missing is the intention for an experience. For too many organizations, the idea of a great customer experience is expected to occur naturally, without a clear strategy defining what expectations makes a great customer experience for your brand, and without a clear plan to make sure it happens.

We hear and celebrate stories of fantastic customer experiences. This one about a barista at Starbucks is getting a lot of attention lately. It’s amazing what some people are capable of when on the stage of customer service. Some staff seem to thrive on the human interaction, and these people are gold. But our customer service strategy should set up all employees up for success.

I’ve done a rather unscientific study of great customer services experiences. I am willing to bet that most good customer service experiences are the result of a charming individual (staff) taking advantage of opportunities, rather than any staff member acting upon clear objectives, clear training, clear tools and clear strategies for delivering an experience that is consistent with your brand—and the flexibility to make it happen. Most excellent experiences are a happy accident; a symptom of a great employee, not a good system.

And if it’s not part of your systems, it’s not part of your brand.

Great staff are a curse because they give weak managers the impression that the brand is responsible for inspiring great experiences. They are a curse because they remind our customers what is possible, without the confidence that the experience will be repeated. They are a curse because they are not actually part of our brand.

Do you have a vision for a customer service experience? Do you have systems, standards and tools in place to make sure that your vision for excellent customer service is the rule and not the exception? Do you hire great people, train them well, and give them permission to build relationships that people can depend on?

Is a defined customer service experience an intentional part of your brand strategy?

The Curse of the Accidental Brand

A brand that adds value to your organization is a purposeful effort; a strategy that supports your goals. It doesn’t have to be complicated, but it can’t be accidental.

An accidental brand starts off innocently and with the best intentions. A new organization launches and does a few thing right, but in all the chaos of getting started leaders neglect to consider the strategy for the brand. Perhaps they design a snappy logo and recruit a few good people; perhaps they develop a catchy promotion and have a product that generates some buzz. They collect employees or volunteers, customers or supporters, but there is no deep connection to the brand.

Thanks to a solid model behind their operations, the organization will see some success. Enthusiasm pays off. Quick profit or attention—arguably important but a shortsighted goal—makes everyone feel confident in the brand, especially the leadership team. Unfortunately, a little success is enough to be dangerous.

Yes, dangerous.

Within the daily grind that every organization experiences, routine becomes a system and mediocre becomes a comfortable standard. The resulting culture and brand experience lack the direction and conviction of a brand with vision and purpose. Any passion that first launched the company is now stale. The momentum of familiarity dominates the efforts, and past successes become an irrational crutch for a lack of innovation or growth to move forward. The organization has created an accidental brand, and it can persist for years.

Accidental brands are dangerous because over time they give the impression that they are solid and valuable when really all they are is comfortable and inoffensive. Accidental brands get stale, and then they get sloppy. Accidental brands get blindsided by enthusiastic competition.

Enthusiastic competition is fueled by a passion for the brand experience, and they are hungry for success. Enthusiastic competition shatters preconceived expectations and limitations. Enthusiastic competition trusts, nurtures and rewards their stakeholders with innovation. Enthusiastic competition is relentless about understanding what sits at the core of the relationship.

Accidental brands are cursed because moderate success and familiar habits limit innovation; there’s a perceived a risk to change while blindly ignoring the opportunities of evolution. Accidental brands forget that enthusiastic competition is always possible.

Routine is never a rule, and mediocre is never worthy. Don’t let your brand be accidental.